Photos of "The Fungus Fairy" Foraging for Juicy Mushrooms
Andrew Cannon, sometimes known as "The Fungus Fairy"
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Birch polypore
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Birch polypore (Fomitopsis betulina), one of the more common fungi seen on dead or dying birch.
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Birch polypore (Fomitopsis betulina)
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Unidentified LBM (little brown mushroom)
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The lumpy bracket (Trametes gibbosa)
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Stereum ostrea, a wood decay crust fungi
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Clitocybe species. Mushrooms in the genus Clitocybe primarily decompose forest leaf litter. There are many species of white Clitocybe that are macroscopically indistinguishable in our area. The most famous member of the genus is the blewit, which is edible and readily identified by its purple to lavender color.
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Clitocybe species
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Pholiota species
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American Giant Millipede (Narceus americanus complex)
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Chicken of the woods (Laetiporus sulphureus)
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Mushroom foraging with Andrew Cannon
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Mushroom foraging with Andrew Cannon
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Mushroom foraging with Andrew Cannon
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Beefsteak polypore (beef steak because of the marbled interior) or ox tongue (because of the pink color and pimple like pores), aka Fistulina hepatica. Not uncommon but rarely found in quantity. Excellent edible with a sour taste. One of a few mushrooms in New York that is so unique, it has virtually no close lookalikes.
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Maze polypores (Daedaleopsis confragosa). Called the “maze polypore” for the maze-like pores on the underside of the cap.
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Maze polypores (Daedaleopsis confragosa)
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Wine caps (Stropharia rugosoannulata) — a large edible mushroom often found in landscaping wood chips.
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Chinese Mantis (Tenodera sanensis), a large and invasive praying mantis
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Chinese Mantis (Tenodera sanensis)
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Chinese Mantis (Tenodera sanensis)
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Birch polypore
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Northern two-lined salamander (Eurycea bislineata)
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Stereum ostrea
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Stereum ostrea
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The resin polypore (Ischnoderma resinosum), the colored droplets forming on the pore surface are called “guttation” and are a metabolic byproduct of the rapid growth of the fungus
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Egg of the stinkhorn fungus (Phallus impudicus)
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Xylaria species
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Psathyrella species
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Psathyrella piluformis
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Ganoderma sessile, one of the species of reishi in our area of New York. This is a popular supplement and staple of traditional Chinese medicine.
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Cutting open the egg of the stinkhorn fungus (Phallus impudicus)
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Stump puffball (Lycoperdon pyriforme), one of our most common puffballs and often found in large clusters. This mushroom is edible.
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Andrew Cannon eating thin slices of raw beefsteak polypore.
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Pluteus aurantiorugosus — a rare, brightly-colored wood decomposing fungi not seen in our area most years.
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Deer mushroom (Pluteus cervinus)
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Wolf’s milk slime (Lycogala epidendrum)
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Looking at pholiota species
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Pluteus aurantiorugosus — a rare, brightly-colored wood decomposing fungi not seen in our area most years.
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Cheese polypore (Tyromyces chioneus)
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Stinkhorn egg (Phallus impudicus)
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Violet-toothed polypore (Trichaptum biforme)
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Stump puffball (Lycoperdon pyriforme). The interior of the puffball is white and has a soft texture — as it matures, the flush dries out and turns into a mass of dried spores which “puff” out of a small hole in the top of the sphere. Here, Andrew Cannon is agitating them to get the spores in the air.
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Unidentified LBM (little brown mushroom)
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Gannoderma sessile
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Crowded parchment (Stereum complicatum) and an unidentified jelly fungus
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Chicken of the woods (Laetiporus sulphureus)
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Chicken of the woods (Laetiporus sulphureus)
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Honey mushrooms (Armillaria species)
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Large clump of old and soggy honey mushrooms, growing on the roots of a dead hardwood
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Digging out the base of Amanita crenulata. For many mushrooms, and Amanita species in particular, the base of the stem is an important feature for identification
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Clitocybe nuda, the wood blewit. A good edible. They often have a peculiar odor of orange juice concentrate.
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Honey mushroom, Armillaria species, showing the string cheese like texture of the stem
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Pluteus species
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