How to Dab Without a Torch - Culture | MERRY JANE
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How to Dab Without a Torch

Seeking a more convenient way to dab? Find a method that works for you here.

by Tyler Terps

by Tyler Terps

Torches are the biggest turn off for people that are hesitant to dab. It's easy to understand, since torches have the ability to start a fire and accidents from mishandling a torch can result in serious injury for the operator. If buying butane and finding a torch that lasts are among your worries, your dabbing options aren’t limited to the traditional method. In fact, if you’re looking for discretion and less to carry in your arsenal, ditching the torch might be exactly what you need.  

Health Stone

Health Stones bring the motions of packing a bowl back to the world of concentrates. These hand pipes and bowl attachments use a 100% inert ceramic stone to make dabbing more portable. Dabs are applied on top of the stone, and then a small cigar lighter applies just the right amount of heat to vaporize the oils. The portability of an Inner Cooler Hand Vape changes the game of dabbing on the go. If you still want to use your vapor rig, try out the attachment that hooks a healthstone up to your rig. Previously, vaporizers were the only option, but now glass enthusiasts can stay high on the move without a huge torch. The average lifespan of a vapor stone is around six months, depending on how often it is used. 

Vaporizer

Vaporizers are a great option to enjoy your cannabis concentrates when you’re not at home. Most devices have a compact design and contain strong batteries to last the day on one charge. The dabs are heated up with a coil in a chamber that’s known as an atomizer. Coils can be made of quartz, ceramic or titanium, much like dab nails are. Usually these atomizers need to be replaced within a few months, depending on how much use they receive. These tools come in prices ranging from $30 to over $200 for those considering a budget, but be warned - you'll get the quality you are willing to pay for.

Topping a Bowl

Before there was any sort of vaporizer or glass nail designed to properly enjoy your dabs, the go-to method was to top your greens with hash oil. Due to its ability to liquify easily, the wax melts into the herbs and combusts along with the dry material. If you’re sharing the bowl with multiple people, stretching the wax out to cover as much as possible while cornering the bowl allows everyone to join in on the added terpenes. The recommended amount of concentrates to use is about the size of two average dabs for the individual smoking it. You end up using more when topping a bowl because packs of dry herb last longer than hits from a nail. For certain consistencies that are harder to work with your hands, try melting the wax on with a lighter to guarantee an even coating.

E-Nail

Electric nails are the definition of dabbing without a torch. These devices have a box that supplies power to a coil which wraps around the outside of your titanium, quartz or ceramic nail. This tool eliminates the need to buy butane every week or a torch every few years, and in addition, the fact that you can take a dab whenever you want and remain at a consistent temperature when doing so seals the deal. Before using one, be sure to test out your glass and check that the coil won’t cause your piece to tip over once it’s standing on its own. If it’s easy to tip over with a nail in the joint, it might not be the best rig to use. E-Nails can range from $100 to over $500, but every company brings a product with its own advantage and selling point to every budget.

Coating a Joint

Using concentrates to coat the outside of your joint adds to the potency, taste and burn when smoking it. When you introduce dabs to the world of dry herbs, the combined high is very powerful. If you’re dealing with wax that’s easy to handle, try working it into a long snake to make the process easier. From here, wrap the long strand around the outside of the paper. For unstable sap, budder and crumble, use your dab tool to almost paint the joint with dabs. Try not to saturate both ends in the process because you’ll need one as a mouthpiece when smoking.


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Tyler Terps

Tyler is a cannabis journalist and enthusiast that seeks to educate his readers to continue to reveal the true power of the cannabis. Starting as a music journalist, Tyler contributed to websites like Jambase.com, RelixMag.com, NYSMusic.com, and Jambands.com. Now he continues to contribute as a freelance writer, now covering cannabis for publications like High Times, PotGuide.com, and MassRoots’ blog. Find him on the MassRoots app under the username @TerrapinTerps.



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