Vice’s Abdullah Saeed Talks the Joy of Spliffs, Growing Weed, and Keeping A Close Eye on Regulation - Culture | MERRY JANE
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Vice’s Abdullah Saeed Talks the Joy of Spliffs, Growing Weed, and Keeping A Close Eye on Regulation

The “Weediquette” columnist and host of Viceland’s “Bong Appetit” plants seeds of wisdom.

by Zoe Wilder

by Zoe Wilder

Chances are, you’ve read Abdullah “T. Kid” Saeed’s cannabis-centric articles in the likes of Vice, High Times, Paper, Huffington Post, or Complex. Recently he’s stepped in front of the camera to deliver entertaining tutorials on how to smoke weed using household items, fascinating interviews with cannabis industry professionals, and riveting documentaries about marijuana culture and policy. Saeed’s a globetrotter with a wealth of experience getting to know the growing cannabis industry across boundaries. MERRY JANE recently caught up with the Kid for a quick Q&A sesh. Strap in.

MERRY JANE: L.A. or NYC?
Abdullah “T. Kid” Saeed:
New York City is definitely home in a lot of ways, as is Philly, and that’s where most of my people are, but I like weed, hate the cold, and I spend most of my free time at home, so L.A. probably makes more sense.

Vice takes you on a lot of adventures. You’re everywhere. Where’s the most memorable place you’ve been?
Earlier this year, I traveled to Nepal to film a documentary about Mad Honey in the Annapurna region. Anyone who lives in New York and then sees that kind of beauty is bound to have a profound experience. I also had a couple of days on my own in Kathmandu and it was the first time I was in a place where I looked like everyone and could talk to them, because most people there speak Hindi. That was a trip, too. Definitely one of my favorite places in the world.

You’ve been putting out a lot of work lately. What projects are you working on?
Right now I’m filming the first Viceland season of Bong Appetit, my show about edible cannabis. It was a Munchies web series and is now going to TV in a new format. I’m bringing celebrated chefs, most of whom have never cooked with cannabis, to my cannabis kitchen in L.A. to prepare multi-course infused dinners. With cannabis now legal in some form in more than half of the country, I’m crazy excited for people to see what we’re doing with it as a culinary ingredient. It will start airing on Viceland in December.

What gets your adrenaline rushing?
Honestly, I’m not much for adrenaline. I sometimes do crazy shit for work, and I have fun doing it, but mostly I like to sit on the couch, smoke spliffs, and watch Jeopardy.

You’re educating a lot of people on a lot of topics and introducing people across the world to new ideas. Do you have anything you’d like to cover with the readers of this interview, specifically?
MERRY JANE readers are probably pretty attuned to my point of view on cannabis policy, but one thing I’d like to espouse regarding cannabis culture is that weed is for everyone. As it grows more expansive in America, the ethos around cannabis treats it more as a commodity, and we’re in danger of losing sight of what this is—a therapeutic plant that grows everywhere and should be available to everyone. I caution every weed-loving American to consider that legalization means trusting the authorities that unjustly prohibited cannabis for so long to now justly regulate it. Don’t take it for granted.

If you could introduce one piece of groundbreaking legislation, what would it be?
If it were up to me, everyone would just grow cannabis and no one would buy or sell it. Fuck money.

You’ve mentioned spliffs are your favorite medium for consuming cannabis, does this still hold true?
Yes! Spliffs all day. I roll little dudes, like a dozen or so a day, 9:1 weed to tobacco, usually a little keef or concentrate. Spliffs are making a comeback even though a lot of people are still really offended by tobacco.

Who’s the most interesting person you’ve shared a spliff with?
I recently had the honor of smoking multiple spliffs with hash-making legend Frenchy Cannoli. The way that guy talks about weed would make the Pope want to light up a fatty. He rolls spliffs Moroccan style, using a section of cigarette tobacco as the filter. He spent years in some of the world's most ancient cannabis centers. He said to me, “It’s crazy to me that I’m teaching you about all this. This is your culture!”

What does your music mean to you?
My music is my creative byproduct. It just comes out because that’s what I do instead of play video games or exercise. I’ve made music on my own and with bands since I was a teenager. The last band I played with was my homies the Kominas. Right now I’m doing solo stuff, which is all weird kinda abstract rap music. I’m finishing up my next album right now. Here’s a track from it. And this was my last album. I don't know if anyone likes my music or listens to it, but I don’t really care. I’m just making it.

What’s your favorite music to listen to while high?
I only listen to music high, so I guess just my favorite shit. Nineties rap, ’90s electronic music, old punk and psych rock from around the world, classic R&B. Overall, I spend most of my time listening to hip-hop instrumentals—Pete Rock, Diamond D, Madlib, E-Swift, [Dan the] Automator, etc.

Hypothetical: Every possible form and manifestation of cannabis that is already known or yet to be discovered is available to you to indulge in. What do you choose, and why?
Honestly, I’d probably still just be smoking a spliff! Even with the current tech out, I stick to my ceremony.


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Zoe Wilder

Zoe Wilder is a writer based in Portland, Oregon, with a Bachelor of Arts in English Literature from the College of William & Mary and a Master of Social Work from Fordham University.



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